Cognitive Enhancement Weekly for May 6, 2018

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The top news item this week is the death of Ascendance Biomedical’s CEO, Aaron Traywick. Also, artificial retinas, YouTube’s apparent attack on nootropics content, and the cognitive benefits of music and language training.

Studies

Musical training, bilingualism, and executive function: working memory and inhibitory control

Early studies suggested the possibility of a cognitive advantage from musical training and bilingualism but have failed to be replicated by recent findings. To assess whether cognitive benefits from training exist, and how unique they are to each training domain, this study compared musicians and bilinguals to each other, plus to individuals who had expertise in both skills, or neither. The findings confirm previous associations between musicians and improved cognition and extend existing evidence to show that benefits are narrower than expected but can be uniquely attributed to music compared to another specialized auditory skill domain.

https://cognitiveresearchjournal.springeropen.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s41235-018-0095-6

News

Biohacker and CEO of Ascendence Biomedical Aaron Traywick Found Dead in DC

The biohacker community suffered a loss this week. Aaron was found dead in a float tank in DC. It is currently unknown if [Ascendence](https://ascendance.io%5D will continue operations. Before he died, Ascendance was planning a CRISPR-based trial for treating lung cancer.

http://www.newsweek.com/aaron-traywick-biohacker-who-injected-himself-diy-herpes-drug-found-dead-908001 https://www.technologyreview.com/s/611076/before-he-died-this-biohacker-was-planning-a-crispr-trial-in-mexico/

YouTube Is Removing Some Nootropics Channels

YouTube deleted at least three nootropics channels over the past three days, leaving members of the community confused and worried that a larger crackdown is coming. Apparently this wasn’t targeted, per the updated Motherboard article, but it leaves more questions than answers about YouTube’s enforcement and appeal guidelines.

https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/9kgpk5/youtube-is-removing-nootropics-channelshttps://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/paxjvv/youtube-says-some-nootropics-channels-were-removed-mistakenl

New Studies Show Dark Chocolate Can Enhance Cognitive And Immune Health

Although doctors have known about dark chocolate’s health benefits for awhile, these new studies are the first to look specifically at the brains and immune systems of human patients. Flavonoids, an antioxidant, are credited with reducing brain and heart inflammation, but these antioxidants aren’t limited to chocolate. They’re also found in dark vegetables and fruits.

https://alivenewspaper.com/2018/04/new-studies-show-dark-chocolate-can-enhance-cognitive-immune-health/

Pupils are taking drugs to help them perform well in exams, says Dr Miriam Stoppard

It’s finals season for many college and university students, which means a raft of “smart drugs” articles. Many of these are overblown and designed to create more FUD than fact.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/health/pupils-taking-drugs-help-perform-12474758

Scientists develop ‘artificial retina’ in hope to restore sight to the blind

A cheap new artificial retina could soon be used to restore sight to the blind. Researchers from Tel Aviv and Linkoping have developed a small, photoactive film capable of converting light into electrical signals that stimulate light-sensitive nerve cells in the eye. It is hoped that the research could lead to the development of a wireless implant which could be inserted in the eye of a person whose light-sensitive cells have degraded. This technology may be adapted for other biological applications.

https://www.rt.com/news/425898-blind-cure-neurons-retina-implant/

Launching Cognitive Enhancement Weekly

Since I published my research on cognitive enhancement drugs in the workplace, I’ve been looking for ways to continue my research and share what I’ve learned. With email lists making a bit of a comeback over the last year, I decided to create a curated email list. Much of my inspiration came from the work Joe Crobak has done with Data Eng Weekly (formerly Hadoop Weekly) and I’ve stolen liberally from him to get started.

If you’re interested in smart drugs, nootropics, neuroethics, biohacking and other forms of cognitive enhancement, you can subscribe to the list here: cognitiveenhancementweekly.com

And feel free to submit links, news, events and journal articles to me via Twitter.

Should Cognitive Enhancement be Compulsory?

Research supporting the use of cognitive enhancement in healthy people is, at best, inconclusive. But it’s easy to imagine a scenario in which some type of cognitive enhancement is effective at maximizing executive function and working memory with little to no negative impact. This scenario is admittedly far-fetched, but it introduces interesting questions: If cognitive enhancement methods are effective, should certain professions be required to use them? This is the question posed in a 2014 research document.

As the authors point out, progress in science and technology has already impacted countless jobs and created new obligations to use practices and methods that improve outcomes. The counter argument is that these innovations, like antiseptics, are external. They don’t force a professional to alter his or her brain chemistry to possibly deliver better outcomes.

If cognitive enhancement were safe and effective, should those enhancements be used in every situation? Would you want a cognitively enhanced surgeon or pilot?