Content Platforms Censoring Nootropics Content

Earlier this week, Vice reported that YouTube removed several channels that cover nootropics. I also had trouble publishing Cognitive Enhancement Weekly when MailChimp’s automated service detected a violation of its acceptable use policy. While MailChimp quickly resolved my problem, the YouTube channels have yet to be restored.

I think what’s triggering these automated responses is coverage of kratom. Kratom is an opioid-like herb promising relief from pain, depression and anxiety. The DEA has been on the warpath to ban sales of the herb and make it a Schedule 1 drug, putting it in the same category as heroin and LSD.

Prior to this week, I’ve never mentioned kratom in a mailer. The first time I did, the content was flagged. According the to Vice article, at least one the YouTube content creators believes his coverage of kratom is what triggered the ban. Platforms like YouTube have rules that are applied arbitrarily and they frequently leave no avenue for appeal. Suppressing information, especially for substances with questionable efficacy, benefits no one.

My Worst Presentation Experience

There was a recent Twitter thread, which I can no longer find, asking presenters for their worst experiences on stage. I have one that is pretty awful, but too long for Twitter, even with 280 characters per post.

Several years ago, my company put on two events back-to-back. The first two and a half days were about business intelligence (BI), while the second day and a half covered enterprise information management (EIM) and master data management (MDM). Personally, I never understood why the two events were separate. The topics are linked too tightly. Luckily, we’ve since restructured the event into one cohesive offering.

One side effect of having two events is that sometimes you gave the same presentation twice. That’s what happened to me on the transition day: I gave one pitch in the morning to a business intelligence audience, then had to give it 90 minutes later to the EIM crowd. Only it wasn’t a crowd. See, once people registered for the EIM portion, they were free to attend BI sessions. As a consequence, I only had about seven people in my second session.

The small audience wasn’t a problem. The problem is how the audience shrank from seven to six.

Apparently an attendee from the previous session was having a health scare and she couldn’t be moved out of the room, and the EMTs took some time to arrive. Fortunately, they arrived about 10 minutes into my presentation, when they proceeded to take her vitals, give her oxygen and strap her onto a gurney. With about 5 minutes to go in my pitch, they wheeled her out to a waiting ambulance.

The entire time, my rapidly shrinking audience was trying to listen to me babble on about data lakes when everyone was distracted by the medical emergency in the back of the room. Needless to say, my scores for that session weren’t great.

How I Work (Travel)

A popular cliché is that you should enjoy the journey as much as the destination. When it comes to business travel, that’s not my policy. My policy is to make the journey as painless and ignorable as possible. That’s shaped how I travel. Here’s how I get from point A to B and back.

About My Travel

I travel just over 100,000 miles a year, mostly for events that my company puts on. I need to pack a couple suits, dress shirts and training gear. I may also need to take weather gear like coats, gloves, etc. I also travel with a lot of electronics: Kindle, iPad, laptop and noise canceling headphones.

Luggage

I have an unhealthy obsession with the idea of one-bag travel. There are dozens of structured backpacks that apparently work well for tourists and casual travelers, but I always travel with at least one suit and several shirts. Add in workout gear, casual clothes, another pair of shoes, dopp kit and electronics, and you’re talking about looking like a wrinkled mess when you get where you’re going. A structured suitcase is essential.

My go-to carry-on is the overpriced Tumi Alpha International. I fell into the Tumi because I got a Tumi gift card from my employer when I finished my MBA. (This was probably their way of telling me to take a hike.)

tumi_alpha2

The Tumi lets me easily pack enough for a 3-day work trip and the bag has been flawless over five-plus years and hundreds of thousands of miles of air travel. The bag still looks new, but that’s not because of some special Tumi magic. It looks new because I never check it. The Tumi warranty is only 5 years and it’s fairly limited. Because of the paltry warranty Tumi chooses to put on its overpriced luggage, I check a different bag for longer trips. This is where the Briggs & Riley comes in.

My second bag is the Briggs & Riley Baseline.

u122cx-7f_1

I’m a fan of Briggs & Riley because of their lifetime warranty and innovative internal expansion system. The bags wear well and have quality construction. In addition to the Baseline, I have another large rolling suiter that’s been through hell and back. Once, I used a hotel sewing kit to make emergency repairs while in Sydney. I’ve also sent it in for warranty service multiple times. Wirecutter also has nice things to say about the brand.

For longer trips when I can’t do laundry, like a week-long, multi-city trip, I’ll divide clothing between the two carry-ons. Then I check one and keep the other so I’m covered if the airline loses a piece of luggage. As I travel, I move the dirty clothes into the checked bag. The B&R bag takes most of the abuse since it’s always the one I check.

Another essential piece of luggage is a lightweight daypack. I prefer the REI Flash 22. It’s easily packable, but still has great capacity at 22 liters.

rei_flash_22

If that’s too much, there’s also the Flash 18, as well as several great options from North Face, Osprey and others. These are great for tourist activities, or for carrying your gear to the nearest gym.

Packing

Packing comes down to what I take and how I organize it in my luggage. I heavily rely on Eagle Creek packing cubes. I have multiple sizes, but always get the lightest weight version. Packing cubes simplify everything about packing, unpacking and general organization. And if customs wants to rifle through your stuff, cubes make it easier to repack and get on your way.

On the Plane

This is where I try to zone out as much as possible. I’ve found two things to help make that possible:

Contoured sleep mask

sleepmask

This mask is countered so it stays off your eyes and the elastic band doesn’t bite into the tops of your ears.

Ear plugs

Screen Shot 2018-04-04 at 18.57.33

I use these ear plugs with my noise canceling headphones to block as much noise as possible.

I’m always interested in approaches, products or techniques others use to master their air travel. If you’ve got a tip, please leave it in the comments.

 

Film Review: “Take Your Pills”

“Adderall and Instagram are hand in hand with being the perfect student.” 

Alison Klayman’s look at Adderall is sometimes compelling, but often repetitive. The Netflix documentary, which premiered on March 16th, explores amphetamine use by students, professional athletes and working professionals. Adderall, the film’s focus, is alternatively depicted as a blessing for stressed out students and as an overprescribed crutch in demanding work environments.

Throughout the film, which intersperses subject interviews with the history of amphetamines and methylphenidate (Ritalin), you’re introduced to a variety of subjects. One Silicon Valley coder describes Adderall as “rocket fuel” and credits it with allowing to get a job at Google. A college student uses it to cope around exam time and sincerely hopes she’ll be able to manage her adult life without chemical enhancement. A former NFL offensive tackle described his Adderall use during his playing days to deal with pain and focus on otherwise boring tasks. Other than the coder, the sense was that Adderall was less of an enhancer and more of a way to block outside input, allowing users to complete boring or tedious tasks.

Klayman’s work only briefly touched on the issue authenticity. One student asks if she did her work, or if she and Adderall did her work? Should she value her accomplishments as much, knowing that amphetamines were giving her a lift? The question remains unresolved.

The topics of ethics and fairness never come up in “Take Your Pills.” The apparent view is that Adderall use is so widespread, especially on college campuses, that its use should be expected. If you’re not taking it when it is so readily available, you’re the one missing out. Stimulant use has become completely acceptable, at least on college campuses. And as Klayman accurately points out, adults are now the fastest growing segment of Adderall users. It is only a matter of time before it, and its cousins Ritalin and Provigil (modafinil), make their way into the office.

The documentary’s message is clear: Take your pills, or be left behind in an increasingly dehumanizing work environment.

Cognitive Enhancement Weekly for March 11th, 2018

Cognitive Enhancement Weekly is a weekly email covering the latest news, events, journal articles and other content related to cognitive enhancement, nootropics, biohacking and neuroscience. If you want to get this in your inbox every Sunday, you can subscribe here

This week includes a new book on the impact of nutrition on cognitive performance, the future role of performance enhancement on the battlefield, and why you should check your terms and conditions before embedding a chip into your skin.

Books

Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power

Dr. Lisa Mosconi’s book on improving brain function through nutrition has just been released. The book includes recipes, a nutrition plan, and health assessments. Looking forward to reviewing it later.

https://www.amazon.com/Brain-Food-Surprising-Science-Cognitive/dp/0399573992/ref=sr_1_1

News

Performance Enhancers: From Battlefield to Playing Field

Fascinating look at the history of performance enhancing drugs on the battlefield and what the next generation of enhancement might look like: robotic exoskeletons and brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Also interesting is how the Australian Defense Force is using WADA as a jumping off point for research and policy definition.

https://worldview.stratfor.com/article/performance-enhancers-battlefield-playing-field-military-amphetamines-athletes-doping

Pill may be able to mimic the effects of exercise without having to run a single step

Compounds 516 and 14, referred to in the article, may mimic the effects of exercise by triggering a specific genetic circuit allowing patients to gain exercise-related benefits from those unable to exercise. Researchers are targeting specific kinds of muscular dystrophy and sclerosis as a path to regulatory approval, but the possibility of abuse is obvious.

https://www.thestar.com/life/2018/03/09/pill-may-be-able-to-mimic-the-effects-of-exercise-without-having-to-run-a-single-step.html

Take Your Pills, Netflix — the highs and lows of ‘brain-hacking’

The FT has a take on the new Netflix documentary, “Take Your Pills,” exposing the impact of Adderall society on students. “Take Your Pills” is available on March 16th.

https://www.ft.com/content/146c23c6-238d-11e8-add1-0e8958b189ea

New Doccie Delves Deep Into America’s Massive Pharmaceutical Industry

Another Netflix documentary on doping in sport won an Oscar last weekend. “Icarus” details the Russian doping scandal and it’s pretty explosive. No one should be surprised, of course. Some of the most effective performance and cognitive enhancers are based on Russian and Soviet research.

http://www.2oceansvibe.com/2017/08/14/icarus-the-new-doccie-about-doping-in-sport-is-both-brilliant-and-terrifying-trailer/

Six Things You Learn When You Go Deep on Microbiome Research

This is a bit of a different take on biohacking, with a focus on your microbiome – the bacterial world that resides inside you. But regardless of what the article suggests, don’t start showering without soap.

https://www.wellandgood.com/good-advice/gut-health-microbiome-what-to-know/

The Cybernetic Implant That Attunes You to the Earth’s Poles

How useful would it be to know where magnetic north is? Useful enough to warrant a painful and invasive surgery? Then I’ve got the cyborg implant for you!

http://www.surfacemag.com/articles/north-sense-cybernetic-implant/

Would You Ditch the Gym for a Biohacking Facility?

In another spin-off of the Bulletproof brand, Bulletproof Labs is the company’s first biohacking facility located in Santa Monica. The approach is technology-heavy but appears to lack much in the way of technology rigor.

https://www.pcmag.com/news/359203/would-you-ditch-the-gym-for-a-biohacking-facility

Authorities Deactivate Transit Pass Implanted In Biohacker’s Hand

“Meow-Ludo Disco Gamma Meow-Meow cut a chip out of a travel card, encased it in biocompatible plastic, and implanted it under the skin on his left hand.” That clearly violated terms of use and it was disabled.

https://www.coherentnews.com/authorities-deactivate-transit-pass-implanted-in-biohackers-hand/

Do Olympic curlers need to be jacked and tan?

Over the weekend, the news broke that a Russian Olympic curler tested positive for meldonium, a substance that reportedly improves exercise capacity. The response was expected: why would a curler need performance enhancing drugs? It’s easy to dismiss the possibility of PEDs in low-impact sports like curling, but that overlooks the different types of PEDs available and the type of event the athlete was competing in.

Types of Events

Most of the curling I’ve watched during the Winter Olympics has been the 4-person teams. (Yep, I watch curling. I’m an Olympics fanatic.) The athlete in question competes in the 2-person mixed pairs event. Half the personnel means twice the work, and curling matches are long. The sport looks trivial on television, but it requires fine motor control and endurance. Improving your physical capacity and stamina will always give you better results. While I’m not accusing the athlete of doping, and I frankly don’t care if he does, doping in curling isn’t outside the realm of possibility.

Whenever there’s a competition and the stakes are higher than bragging rights, the possibility for doping exists.

Types of Performance Enhancing Drugs

A common misconception is that PEDs are only useful for making someone more muscular, or perhaps faster. The range of PEDs goes well beyond that. Some drugs, like EPO, stimulate red blood cell production. The increase in red blood cells allows more oxygen to be delivered. EPO can be useful for competitors in endurance events.

Other PEDs are may improve performance in more subtle ways. Beta blockers reduce blood pressure and also suppress the physical symptoms of anxiety, such as involuntary muscle movements, which could be key in sports requiring fine motor skills like curling, archery and shooting.

Is meldonium a viable PED for curling? It’s hard to say. Effectiveness of meldonium in improving athletic performance is still being debated. The clinical use of the drug is to treat coronary heart disease, but it is also used to treat symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal.

 

Launching Cognitive Enhancement Weekly

Since I published my research on cognitive enhancement drugs in the workplace, I’ve been looking for ways to continue my research and share what I’ve learned. With email lists making a bit of a comeback over the last year, I decided to create a curated email list. Much of my inspiration came from the work Joe Crobak has done with Data Eng Weekly (formerly Hadoop Weekly) and I’ve stolen liberally from him to get started.

If you’re interested in smart drugs, nootropics, neuroethics, biohacking and other forms of cognitive enhancement, you can subscribe to the list here: cognitiveenhancementweekly.com

And feel free to submit links, news, events and journal articles to me via Twitter.