Using Your Presentations to Build a Content Library

I happened across a tweet from Brianne Kimmel today where she offered a practical, if unpopular, view:

She is 100% correct. If all you’re doing is speaking at one or two conferences with that deck you worked your tail off to produce on time, you should have used that time for something more substantial.

The key is leverage.

You can take that one presentation and turn it into at least three 1000-word blog posts. You can create a webinar – perhaps even training material you can sell. Or a planning toolkit or reference architecture. Get invited onto a podcast and talk about what you talked about.

There is no reason you can’t dine out for a year on the content you create from one presentation. When I make a deck, it is usually the result of 2-3 published documents. I later use the deck to create a toolkit of board-ready slides and multiple webinars throughout the course of the year. Sometimes I’ll reuse that deck in subsequent years with minor, sometimes major, changes. And everything else I created based off of that deck gets updated too.

Brianne’s advice is spot-on: focus on compounding activities. Your conference presentations can be a great beginning – or result – of those efforts. The key is leverage.

Avoiding Weasel Words in Your Business Writing

My day job as an industry analyst gives me great exposure to all kinds of business writing. Some of it is good. A lot of it isn’t. A common trait of bad business writing is what I call the illusion of action, or giving the appearance that you’re advising or instructing your reader to do something, but the action is either nonexistent or vague. From the content I’ve reviewed, weasel words are a big contributor to weak business writing.

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Improving Your Business Writing in 2018

A large part of my day job is reviewing what my colleagues’ write. Every reviewer has certain things he or she is looking for, and the top of my checklist is finding and removing useless content. My goal is to make a document 5-10% shorter, which is generally easy to do because of one mistake I see writers make repeatedly:

They apologize for writing the document. 

Clearly, the authors aren’t coming out with a direct apology. These apologies are indirect and take the form of extensive history or context. Long narratives about how the world got to its current state, even in the context of databases or artificial intelligence, come off as defensive and tedious in business writing.

One method to help produce concise writing is SCQA (Situation, Complication, Question, Answer), although there are several others in similar veins. McKinsey likes Situation-Complication-Resolution (SCR). Regardless, the intent in the same:

Situation: Describe what’s happening in a simple way. “Growth has stagnated over the last three quarters and we must open up new regions to return to growth.” (Okay, not the most compelling story, but you get the idea.)

Complication: Outline what makes the situation challenging. This part needs to be clear, and separate from the situation. “We are having trouble hiring sales staff in the new regions, and existing staff are fully utilized.” This is also where you can support the complication with additional data points. Be as brief as possible.

Question: State the question that will get you to the proposed answer. “Should we continue exploring sales staff increases or rely more heavily on digital marketing?” The advantage of the SCR method is you can skip this and get right to the recommended actions.

Answer (or Resolution): Deliver your key point or points. Optionally, you can support your answers with additional data, but be brief.  “We must take both options by restructuring sales to target new, higher growth regions and building a targeted digital marketing strategy.” 

To improve your writing, write targeted documents and avoid the history lesson. If you simply must include the history, put it in an end note.