Avoiding Weasel Words in Your Business Writing

My day job as an industry analyst gives me great exposure to all kinds of business writing. Some of it is good. A lot of it isn’t. A common trait of bad business writing is what I call the illusion of action, or giving the appearance that you’re advising or instructing your reader to do something, but the action is either nonexistent or vague. From the content I’ve reviewed, weasel words are a big contributor to weak business writing.

Weasel words are words that avoid taking a position. You likely see them on a daily basis but they don’t catch your eye because you’re used to weak business writing. The weasel words I’m always on the lookout for are:

Assume Believe Consider Expect
Imagine Know Look Monitor
Own Realize Recognize Reflect
Remember Think Understand

Getting away from the business context for a moment, let’s say you’re reading about grilling steaks. When it gets to the part about determining the doneness, the step simple states:
Assess the temperature of your steak for desired doneness. [Bad recommendation]

What does that mean? How do I assess it? By touch? If you’re experienced on the grill, this might make perfect sense to you. But if you’re experienced, it’s unlikely you’re reading the recipe in the first place.

Instead, a weasel-free recommendation might look like:
Use a digital thermometer to check the doneness of your steak. Rare steaks are between 120° and 125°, while medium rare steaks… [Good recommendation]

The good recommendation tells the reader how to do something and, when necessary or available, provides some data supporting or scoping the recommendation.

Let’s Talk About ‘Leverage’

‘Leverage’ is a massively overused word in business writing. I can argue that it’s a weasel word because it is used to avoid taking a position, but it almost always means ‘use.’ You’re better off using the simpler and more direct language. The same is true of ‘utilize.’ Always use the shorter, more direct version to communicate with your audience.

Weasel words are evasive and destroy the value you’re trying to create for your audience. Avoid them by taking a position for your reader. If you find that difficult, you may not know your audience or the topic well enough yet.

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