How I Work (Productivity)

This is the second in a series of posts about how I do my day job. You can find the first post here: How I Work (Tools)

At this point, I feel like I’ve tried every available productivity tool and method. I still experiment when I see something new, but I’ve finally refined my process for getting stuff done on a day-to-day basis. There are several pieces, but each is generally simple on its own. Actually, the whole process is simple. Otherwise I wouldn’t follow it.

Project-Based Planning

Today, my go-to for planning projects is the iOS/macOS Reminders app. It doesn’t have a lot of features, but it syncs across my devices and prompts me with annoying notifications when I’m behind on deadlines. I’ve tried things like Todoist, and spent weeks trying to get OmniFocus integrated into my workflow, but I didn’t have the patience to either adjust how I worked to meet the limitations of the software or spend weeks customizing it. Ad hoc projects also land on my plate on a regular basis. I needed something easy and fluid to adapt to that. Lastly, I’m not going to pay for complexity when simplicity is free.

In Reminders, each project I’m working on gets its own list of deliverables, and each deliverable has a priority and due date. If it’s a publishing or presentation project, I also create a notebook in Evernote to store web clippings, notes, PDFs, etc. When a project is completed, the Reminders list is deleted and the Evernote notebook goes into an archived notebook stack. Why don’t I use Evernote’s reminders instead? Because they’re impossible to find across devices. (For such critical component in the way I work, Evernote is a disappointing piece of software.)

The Reminders app is really a staging area for everything that I have to get done, but it can be overwhelming to see everything at once. That’s when I use a simplified bullet journal.

Bullet Journal for Daily Processing

Each morning follows roughly the same pattern. I look through the list projects and see what’s languishing and add the next project-specific deliverable in the list to a notebook  – with actual paper and pen. I might add 3-4 work-related things and 1-2 things around the house I need to get done (clean the litter boxes? yay!). I don’t add more because 1) I know I likely won’t get that far and 2) something else is always waiting in my inbox.

While there are certainly examples of elaborate bullet journals, mine is a simple list of the day’s tasks with boxes to the left. Completed tasks get an ‘x.’ Things that I didn’t complete get an arrow indicating a carry-over to the next day. Sometimes things don’t go my way and I end up carrying things over for days at a time.

Aggressive Time-Boxing for Individual Tasks

This last part is the most recent addition to my productivity process. I received an Esington pomodoro timer as a gift, which forced me to learn about the Pomodoro Technique. Pomodoro is a simplified time management method in which you work for 25 minutes at a time, then take a short break. That’s it. With the 25-minute timer in front of me, it’s easier to avoid distractions and focus on the task at hand. Add some noise canceling headphones, and I’m set.

Why This Works for Me

With hundreds of productivity methods and best practices out there, I find this simple method works for me because:

It’s not overly digital. Notifications flashing on my phone and other screens don’t create a sense of urgency for me. The digital parts are just there to store tasks  until I add them to the treeware notebook. Writing things down and crossing them off gives a sense of satisfaction that checking off a digital box doesn’t. And the physical act of flipping over a 25-minute timer helps me focus in a way that a timer on my phone doesn’t.

It’s simple. Many productivity methods, like GTD IMO, focus on the method instead of the result. Often, they’re so intricate and rigid that they fail to reflect the messy reality of most peoples’ work lives. My cobbled together method may not look pretty or win any awards, but it doesn’t have to. It only has to help me get stuff done.

Does this sound like your productivity method? Did you get OmniFocus to work for you? (If you did, I’d like to know how.) Let me know in the comments.

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