Raising Capital: ICOs or VCs?

So far in 2017, there have been 92 initial coin offerings (ICOs) that have raised over $1.2 billion. That surpasses the amount raised by startups from angel and early seed rounds. This hype has me thinking about how startups may fund themselves in the future, and what role VCs might play, if any. I don’t pretend to be an expert in either space, just interested in both.

ICOs aren’t a transfer of equity or ownership

Unlike VC funding, ICOs do not transfer company ownership from the issuing organization to the buyer. ICOs issue tokens (“appcoins”) that you can use within a project’s ecosystem, usually in the form access to some product or service that either exists or will exist at some point in the future. If the service is desirable and demand goes up, the value of the appcoin goes up due to presumably limited supply.

Holding an appcoin doesn’t allow you to influence the company or drive product direction. That’s one likely reason why startups are taking the ICO route over angel or early seed investors: why give up equity – and control – if you don’t have to?

Appcoins can be considered an asset, even if they’re completely unregulated. It’s not unreasonable that VCs will start buying and holding appcoins, hoping for appreciation. Appcoins are also more liquid than startup investments, which take several years to pay off (if they ever do). What happens if VCs start making more money from appcoin trading than from traditional venture investments? Will LPs just take their money to dedicated appcoin firms? I don’t know the answers to these questions, but the eventual answers will be interesting.

In the short term, the ICO hype will continue as an unregulated, poorly vetted source of crowdfunding. Hearing how some ICO’s are pitched by eager supporters, it feels like today’s ICOs are a shared speculative fiction largely driven by greed, without accountability for the issuer. Over the long term, my guess is ICOs will become regulated or outlawed by entities like the SEC. If regulated, launching an ICO will likely carry as much overhead as an IPO, and VCs are back in business. The People’s Bank of China (PBOC) has already banned ICOs. Additional regulatory agencies will likely follow suit.

Everyone seems to have thoughts about ICOs and what they’ll mean for the financial industry and the broader population. Let me know what you think in the comments.

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